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How Kenseth's penalty stacks up historically

April 24, 2013, Staff report, NASCAR.com

How Kenseth's penalty stacks up historically
Compare the No. 20 penalty with the biggest penalties in Sprint Cup Series' history

Related: Reaction | NASCAR news release | Video | Inside engines | Fantasy take

After NASCAR officials discovered an illegal connecting rod in the Kansas-winning car of Matt Kenseth, the No. 20 team is facing hefty penalties. The penalties include a $200,000 fine and a suspension for crew chief Jason Ratcliff; 50 owner points plus forfeited points from Kenseth's win at Kansas and a suspended owner's license for the No. 20 car for Joe Gibbs; and 50 driver points as well as the STP 400 Coors Light Pole award toward eligibility for the Sprint Unlimited for the driver himself. Here is a list of the toughest penalties NASCAR has handed out in the Sprint Cup Series to compare just how much trouble Kenseth is in.

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Carl Long, No. 146 | Lowe’s Motor Speedway, May 2009

Violation: Section 12-1: Actions detrimental to stock car racing. Section 12-4-I: Any determination by NASCAR Officials that the Race Equipment used in the Event does not conform to NASCAR rules: Section 20-5.4A: Engine exceeded the maximum engine size of 358.000 cubic inch displacement.

Penalty: Loss of 200 Cup Driver Points.

Matt Kenseth, No. 20 | Kansas Speedway, April 2013

Violation: Section 12-1: Actions detrimental to stock car racing. Section 12-4J: Any determination by NASCAR Officials that Race Equipment used in the Event does not conform to the NASCAR Rules detailed in Section 20 of the NASCAR Rule Book, or has not been approved by NASCAR prior to the Event. Section 20-5.5.3E.: Only solid magnetic steel connecting rods with a minimum weight of 525.0 grams will be permitted. Connecting rod failed to meet the minimum connecting rod weight.

Penalty: Loss of 50 Cup Driver Points.*

 

Jeremy Mayfield, No. 12 | Talladega Superspeedway, April 2000

Violation: Section 12-4-A: Actions detrimental to stock car racing. Section 8-8: Fuel used by a Competitor that does not meet NASCAR specifications. Section 12-4-AA: Use of altered fuel or fuel other than the official fuel at the Event.

Penalty: Loss of 151 Cup Driver points.

 

Johnny Sauter, No. 70 | Lowe’s Motor Speedway, May 2008

Violation: Section 20-3.1.3A: Wing mounting locations were not as specified by the NASCAR Sprint Cup Series Rule Book.

Penalty: Loss of 150 Cup Driver points.

Appealed: NASCAR Penalty upheld.

 

Scott Riggs, No. 66 | Lowe’s Motor Speedway, May 2008

Violation: Section 20-3.1.3A: Wing mounting locations were not as specified by the NASCAR Sprint Cup Series Rule Book.

Penalty: Loss of 150 Cup Owner points.

Appealed: NASCAR Penalty upheld.

 

Brian Vickers, No. 83 | Martinsville Speedway, October 2008

Violation: Section 12-4-Q: Section 20-2.1D: Exterior sheet metal body parts did not meet the specified minimum thickness.

Penalty: Loss of 150 Cup Driver points.

 

Martin Truex Jr., No. 1 | Daytona International Speedway, July 2008

Violation: Section 12-4-Q: Section 20-3.8A: Roof of the car does not conform to the specifications of the NASCAR Rule Book.

Penalty: Loss of 150 Cup Driver points.

 

Travis Kvapil, No. 43 | Pocono Raceway, June 2010

Violation: Section 12-1: Section 12-4-J: Section 20-10.7J: Unapproved modification to valve stem hardware.

Penalty: 150 Cup Driver Points

 

Clint Bowyer, No. 15 | September 2010, New Hampshire Motor Speedway

Violation: Section 12-1: Actions detrimental to stock car racing. Section 12-4-J: Any determination by NASCAR Officials that the Race Equipment used in the Event does not conform to NASCAR Rules: Section 20-3: The car body location specifications in reference to the certified chassis, does not meet the NASCAR-approved specifications.

Penalty: 150 Cup Driver Points

*These penalties are ranked according to their severity in proportion to the points system used at that time. NASCAR moved to a one-point-per-position format in 2011.