Mobil 1 Technology Hub

Tech Center: The bump stops here

October 29, 2013, Kim Hyde for , NASCAR.COM

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Shock specialist valuable factor in Gordon's success

Read more: Mobil 1 Technology Hub NASCAR Sprint Cup Series competitors simply can't risk a substandard shock setup. It literally can be the difference between a 30th-place finish or tasting the champagne in Victory Lane. Most teams employs at least one shock specialist who is charged with finding the right combination that will allow the car to get as low to the ground as possible without dragging the nose of the Gen-6 model. Hendrick Motorsport crew chief Alan Gustafson relies on veteran shock specialist Chris Golder to make sure Jeff Gordon's No. 24 Chevrolet SS has precise handling and comfort from Martinsville to Texas and everywhere else on the circuit. Golder, 33, grew up in Alpharetta, Ga., greasing his passion for restoring cars alongside his dad who owned an automotive repair shop. Working at the shop through high school and college, Golder says, helped him gain the majority of his mechanical knowledge and experience. ... Read More

Shock specialist valuable factor in Gordon's success

Read more: Mobil 1 Technology Hub NASCAR Sprint Cup Series competitors simply can't risk a substandard shock setup. It literally can be the difference between a 30th-place finish or tasting the champagne in Victory Lane. Most teams employs at least one shock specialist who is charged with finding the right combination that will allow the car ... Read More

Tech Center: Lepp's Scientific approach

August 13, 2013, Kim Hyde for , NASCAR.COM

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Physical training helps Joe Gibbs Racing team cut pit times

When Mike Lepp arrived at Joe Gibbs Racing in 2006, pit stop times averaged 13.6 seconds. Today, using one less pit crew member over-the-wall, they’re running in the upper 11 second range. Quicker stops can be attributed to a bunch of things from the shoes and supportive equipment the pit crew members now wear to better air gun technology and the like.  But, as Lepp explains, today’s pit crews also benefit from a scientific approach to training, nutrition and hydration. “When you’re dealing with human performance, nutrition and physical training are a critical part of that,” Lepp explained.  “In the last 20 years or so, all sports have innovated and improved because they’ve taken a more scientific approach to how they train and develop athletes.”... Read More

Physical training helps Joe Gibbs Racing team cut pit times

When Mike Lepp arrived at Joe Gibbs Racing in 2006, pit stop times averaged 13.6 seconds. Today, using one less pit crew member over-the-wall, they’re running in the upper 11 second range. Quicker stops can be attributed to a bunch of things from the shoes and supportive equipment the pit crew members now wear to better air gun ... Read More

Technology Countdown: HANS device

April 16, 2013, Kristen Boghosian , NASCAR.COM

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Once shunned, wearing the HANS device has become second-nature

Read more: Mobil 1 Technology Hub Dale Earnhardt was known for taking risks. He kept it old-school -- and many respected him for it. But after his death at the Daytona 500 in 2001, NASCAR officials decided that driver safety was more important than preference. In 2002, it mandated the use of a head and neck support (HANS) device to prevent a driver's unrestrained head from moving forward during a front-on collision while their body remained strapped to their seat.   According to Thomas Gideon, senior director of Safety, Research & Development of NASCAR, about six drivers were wearing a HANS device in the Daytona 500 when Dale Earnhardt crashed. That day was a turning point in the way the sport looked at the once laughed-at device.   "There was a major change in the way everybody looked at what they did," he said. ... Read More

Once shunned, wearing the HANS device has become second-nature

Read more: Mobil 1 Technology Hub Dale Earnhardt was known for taking risks. He kept it old-school -- and many respected him for it. But after his death at the Daytona 500 in 2001, NASCAR officials decided that driver safety was more important than preference. In 2002, it mandated the use of a head and neck support (HANS) device to p... Read More

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