Mobil 1 Technology Hub

Tech Center: Remember the Air Titan

February 11, 2014, Ron Lemasters Jr. , NASCAR.COM

[161699691TP010_2013_Daytona]

NASCAR's mighty track-drying system takes efficiency to new levels

There is no sadder place than a race track in the rain. Unless it's a road course, no cars go out on the track when it's wet, and in NASCAR, only the NASCAR XFINITY Series has done it. Those were on a road course as well, in Montreal and Wisconsin. When Mother Nature is on a rampage and pop-up showers bedevil the paying public, what's a racer to do? If you're NASCAR, you call for the Titan. ... Read More

NASCAR's mighty track-drying system takes efficiency to new levels

There is no sadder place than a race track in the rain. Unless it's a road course, no cars go out on the track when it's wet, and in NASCAR, only the NASCAR XFINITY Series has done it. Those were on a road course as well, in Montreal and Wisconsin. When Mother Nature is on a rampage and pop-up showers bedevil the paying public, wh... Read More

Mobil 1 Auto Tech: Inside the R&D Center

May 09, 2014, Ron LeMasters Jr. , NASCAR.COM

[173526483SL00002_NASCAR_R_D]

See how Gene Stefanyshyn is affecting change at NASCAR's R&D Center

When it was first built, the NASCAR Research and Development Center was a work in progress. There was a need for an increased focus on safety, and this was the place to do it. They came up with the Car of Tomorrow, designed to better protect drivers in the event of a frontal impact, and they did a lot of work on energy absorbing foams and barriers on the other end. Today, more than 10 years after its founding, its purpose is still the same -- with a lot more added in. Led by NASCAR Vice-President of Innovation and Racing Development Gene Stefanyshyn, the NASCAR R&D Center is the place where the whole sport is being improved, tweaked, refined and analyzed. Stefanyshyn, with automotive industry chops and a monster IQ, has broken the mission of the R&D Center into five distinct areas, including its original purpose. ... Read More

See how Gene Stefanyshyn is affecting change at NASCAR's R&D Center

When it was first built, the NASCAR Research and Development Center was a work in progress. There was a need for an increased focus on safety, and this was the place to do it. They came up with the Car of Tomorrow, designed to better protect drivers in the event of a frontal impact, and they did a lot of work on energy abso... Read More

Mobil 1 Auto Tech: Looking forward at ... oil spills

April 09, 2014, Ron Lemasters Jr., for , NASCAR.COM

[159337691WS00046_Sylvania_3]

FLIR technology helps clean-up crews spot problem areas quickly

The racing surfaces in NASCAR are, theoretically, pristine and clean and ready for the thunder and lightning that NASCAR has always brought on race day. That's the story, anyway. In reality, it's just like any other piece of asphalt or concrete: it has its clean parts and its not-so-clean parts. When you put high-horsepower machines with slick tires on it, it gets grungy pretty quickly, and the thousands of fans contribute to it, spreading everything from hot dog wrappers to Coke syrup to ... you get the idea. One of the substances that gets on the track and gums up the works is motor oil, and motor oil, like Mobil 1, of course, is great inside the engine, but not so grand when it escapes containment in a speed environment. Slippery doesn't begin to cover motor oil on the track. First of all, it is viscous, another word for thick, and it is a lubricant, which means it protects against heat and thermal breakdown. NASCAR tires aren't treaded; therefore, there's nothing to grab onto the asphalt or concrete. From there, it's on. The result is more spilled oil, a lot of metal and carbon fiber debris and all ... Read More

FLIR technology helps clean-up crews spot problem areas quickly

The racing surfaces in NASCAR are, theoretically, pristine and clean and ready for the thunder and lightning that NASCAR has always brought on race day. That's the story, anyway. In reality, it's just like any other piece of asphalt or concrete: it has its clean parts and its not-so-clean parts. When you put high-horsepower mac... Read More

Technology Countdown: Fire suit, fuel cell

March 12, 2013, Brad Norman , NASCAR.COM

[153785758JH00009_Good_Sam_R]

Fire suits and fuel cells have done a lot for driver safety since the 1960s

In the early days of NASCAR, the clothing drivers wore during races was based mostly on one factor -- comfort.   In the car for hours at a time, and without the technology afforded to today’s competitors, a driver’s apparel often consisted of something he might wear on the street. Blue jeans were cheap and rugged, which made them a fine choice to wear in the 1950s. Many opted to pair jeans with simple T-shirts, usually related to their choice of automotive manufacturer or brand.   There were no fire suits, mandated gloves or helmets, although some drivers did choose to wear those items.   Tim Flock was one of the first drivers to wear what we consider to be a fire suit today. It wasn’t called a fire suit in the 1950s, though, because it wasn’t designed to combat fire. Flock’s get-up, while resembling today’s fire suits, was simply called a uniform. It was thin and had the same effect as wearing street clothes. ... Read More

Fire suits and fuel cells have done a lot for driver safety since the 1960s

In the early days of NASCAR, the clothing drivers wore during races was based mostly on one factor -- comfort.   In the car for hours at a time, and without the technology afforded to today’s competitors, a driver’s apparel often consisted of something he might wear on the street. Blue jeans were cheap and rugged, wh... Read More

Tech Center: NASCAR feels carbon fiber impact

February 11, 2014, Ron Lemasters Jr. , NASCAR.COM

[166520116CH00319_NRA_500_Pr]

Adding carbon fiber makes it seem like space age for the race age

Video: Watch sledge-hammer test on carbon fiber hoods When the new Generation-6 car made its on-track debut in 2013 at Daytona, there was a lot of talk about the new lines and the fact that the new Ford, Chevrolet and Toyota resembled the actual production cars. They weighed less, too, which is important. Less weight means a better power-to-weight ratio, and better power-to-weight means more speed -- theoretically, anyway. It definitely has helped lower the car's center of gravity, which was higher when the Gen-5 was introduced. A savings of 160 pounds -- 100 on the right side and 60 on the left -- might not sound like much, but it makes a huge difference in trying to get one of the cars through a corner. Part of that weight savings came in the form of different materials in the body panels. Yes, NASCAR has entered the world of composites on the outside of the car instead of just inside the mainly sheet steel skin. ... Read More

Adding carbon fiber makes it seem like space age for the race age

Video: Watch sledge-hammer test on carbon fiber hoods When the new Generation-6 car made its on-track debut in 2013 at Daytona, there was a lot of talk about the new lines and the fact that the new Ford, Chevrolet and Toyota resembled the actual production cars. They weighed less, too, which is important. Less weight means a bett... Read More

Technology Countdown: Tire safety

February 26, 2013, Pat DeCola , NASCAR.COM

[163125989MW00015_Subway_Fre]

There's more than meets the eye when NASCAR tires hit the track.

A simple, often overlooked piece of equipment in the eyes of NASCAR fans, the tire’s importance to stock car auto racing cannot be emphasized enough -- especially considering it’s the only part of the vehicle that actually touches the racetrack. The Goodyear, yellow-lettered EAGLE tire is currently the only one used in NASCAR, and has been since 1997. Goodyear hand makes every racing tire for all three NASCAR series, and it makes more than 100,000 tires for NASCAR in a season. In 1966, Goodyear developed the tire-within-a-tire concept, named the Lifeguard Inner Liner Safety Spare, which is still used today. It creates a second envelope inside the main tire to prevent a full blowout, allowing the driver to return to pit road safely to change the flat. NASCAR rules require that all tires must have an inner liner on tracks that are over a mile long. The current tire has a rubber-coated bundle of steel wires that runs along both inside edges of the tire and seals against the wheel, while an inside layer of rubber holds nitrogen gas. The next layer is the belt package, which provides strength and resists punctur... Read More

There's more than meets the eye when NASCAR tires hit the track.

A simple, often overlooked piece of equipment in the eyes of NASCAR fans, the tire’s importance to stock car auto racing cannot be emphasized enough -- especially considering it’s the only part of the vehicle that actually touches the racetrack. The Goodyear, yellow-lettered EAGLE tire is currently the only one used in NASCAR, a... Read More

Mobil 1 Auto Tech: New windshields add to safety

March 06, 2014, Ron Lemasters Jr., for , NASCAR.COM

nascar-nscs-mobil1-auo-tech-future922

Drivers are safer, and vision not affected

Ever had a rock kicked up by a car in front of you impact the windshield of your car? Scares the heck out of you, doesn't it? Imagine the object impacting your wind screen weighing more than a pound and traveling at, oh, 200 mph or so. That's what NASCAR drivers face every time out -- an unwelcome passenger could at any moment climb aboard through the windshield, and depending on the angle, could do more than that. "I grew up racing on dirt," said Tyler Reddick, who drives the No. 19 Ford for Brad Keselowski Racing in the NASCAR Camping World Truck Series. "I'm not even used to having a windshield. On dirt, you see a lot of stuff flying into the car with you, like brake rotors and other parts, and even dirt clods big enough to break your bones." ... Read More

Drivers are safer, and vision not affected

Ever had a rock kicked up by a car in front of you impact the windshield of your car? Scares the heck out of you, doesn't it? Imagine the object impacting your wind screen weighing more than a pound and traveling at, oh, 200 mph or so. That's what NASCAR drivers face every time out -- an unwelcome passenger could at any moment climb aboard through the win... Read More

Technology Countdown: Roll-cage evolution

February 28, 2013, Farrah Kaye , NASCAR.COM

[94174883RG033_General-19]

The roll cage has come a long way since it first debuted in NASCAR in the 1960s

In 1949, one year after NASCAR became incorporated, stock cars raced in Charlotte with limited safety additions. Short of a seatbelt (or a rope, which held the driver in place better) and goggles, there wasn’t much difference between the cars in the parking lot and the cars on the track. In 1952, roll bars were in use, but were not required and most teams chose not to install them. Roll cages, which included more parts and offered more safety, however, started to become more common in the cars. Tim Flock made headlines after winning the 1952 Modified-Sportsman race at Daytona Beach but was disqualified when it was discovered his roll cage was made of wood. Teams became inventive, using bed frames and other devices to create the roll bars. Then came the 1960s and roll-cage structures. They became a more important part of the car itself and were used to stiffen the chassis. This improved the handling and more obviously, the safety of the cars. ... Read More

The roll cage has come a long way since it first debuted in NASCAR in the 1960s

In 1949, one year after NASCAR became incorporated, stock cars raced in Charlotte with limited safety additions. Short of a seatbelt (or a rope, which held the driver in place better) and goggles, there wasn’t much difference between the cars in the parking lot and the cars on the track. In 1952, roll bars were in ... Read More

Tech Center: Where there's a weld there's a way

October 30, 2013, Kim Hyde for , NASCAR.COM

[159334024CH00037_Quicken_Lo]

NASCAR vehicles demand quality welds

NASCAR race cars require hundreds of welds -- and every single one of them has to be perfect. At 200 mph and around every corner, race cars are pushed to the very limits. They have to be strong for safety, but light for performance. The cars built at Stewart-Haas Racing are no exception. Back at the shop, master fabricators such as Daniel Smith spend hours making sure every weld is just right. "I've always wanted to weld," said Smith, a native of Concord, North Carolina, who was born and raised in the heart of motorsports country. After graduating from NASCAR Technical Institute and 5 Off 5 On Pit Crew U in 2004, then-19-year-old Smith landed a full-time position at what was then Haas CNC Racing. Being a typical adventurous teen, Smith quickly earned the nickname "Danger" among his peers at the shop, but that didn’t stop him from putting in long hours of hard work and sacrifice to perfect his craft. "In the beginning, I spent a lot of time in the shop," Smith reminisced. "I would stay after work on my own time to pick up pointers from other welders. I was welding anything and everything I could get my hands ... Read More

NASCAR vehicles demand quality welds

NASCAR race cars require hundreds of welds -- and every single one of them has to be perfect. At 200 mph and around every corner, race cars are pushed to the very limits. They have to be strong for safety, but light for performance. The cars built at Stewart-Haas Racing are no exception. Back at the shop, master fabricators such as Daniel Smith spend hours ma... Read More

Tech Center: Racing's secret ingredient

October 30, 2013, , NASCAR.COM

[D058780034.JPG]

Synthetic lubricants play an integral role in racing

Few companies have been involved in motorsports as long as ExxonMobil, the makers of Mobil 1 synthetic motor oil. The Mobil 1 brand's history in motorsports officially began in 1978. From that time, the presence of Mobil 1 technology on race tracks and circuits has grown by global proportions. Today, synthetic oils are the standard for a variety of lubrication needs for teams competing in NASCAR. Down to the molecular level, synthetic oils are specially formulated to withstand extreme temperatures, flow quickly to protect critical car parts and work to maximize efficiency and performance. With ExxonMobil renewing Mobil 1 as the Official Motor Oil of NASCAR and the Official Lubricant Technology Partner of NASCAR, we’ll detail the development of Mobil 1 synthetic oil in the sport of stock car racing, which is now chosen by more than 50 percent of teams in NASCAR’s top three series. ... Read More

Synthetic lubricants play an integral role in racing

Few companies have been involved in motorsports as long as ExxonMobil, the makers of Mobil 1 synthetic motor oil. The Mobil 1 brand's history in motorsports officially began in 1978. From that time, the presence of Mobil 1 technology on race tracks and circuits has grown by global proportions. Today, synthetic oils are the standard for a vari... Read More