NASCAR Rules Guy

NASCAR by the numbers

December 20, 2013, , NASCAR.COM

by-thenumbers

Fans connect to their favorite drivers via numbers

Numbers help define NASCAR. Lap times and speeds are measured in miles per hour and seconds, and then there's historic numbers -- such as seven championships for Dale Earnhardt and Richard Petty, or 88 career wins for Jeff Gordon. Perhaps no numbers are more meaningful to fans, though, as car numbers. It's how fans spot their favorite drivers on the track, and it instills a sense of loyalty. It's why you see so many Earnhardt fans still holding on to all those "3" shirts. Those car numbers don't always last an entire career, however. For example, prior to the 2013 season, Matt Kenseth had driven the No. 17 for Roush Fenway Racing in every race from 2000-2012 (466 total). When he moved to Joe Gibbs Racing, he did not take the No. 17 with him. Instead, he got in a car with a number already allotted to JGR -- the 20. From 2008-2012, both Tony Stewart and Joey Logano had driven that car. The numbers aren't owned by teams, though. NASCAR owns all numbers and assigns them to car owners. The sanctioning body maintains the right to revoke or transfer any number at any time. Because NASCAR owns the rights to all numbers, car ... Read More

Fans connect to their favorite drivers via numbers

Numbers help define NASCAR. Lap times and speeds are measured in miles per hour and seconds, and then there's historic numbers -- such as seven championships for Dale Earnhardt and Richard Petty, or 88 career wins for Jeff Gordon. Perhaps no numbers are more meaningful to fans, though, as car numbers. It's how fans spot their favorite drivers on... Read More

Freezing the field

December 13, 2013, , NASCAR.COM

freeze-main

When a caution comes out, the field is "frozen", but what does that mean?

In September of 2003, with an eye on further ensuring the safety of competitors, NASCAR announced that racing back to the caution was no longer permitted in all three of the sport's national series. That rule change led NASCAR to institute a procedure where the field is "frozen" on the track once the caution comes out. So what exactly does "freezing the field" entail? ... Read More

When a caution comes out, the field is "frozen", but what does that mean?

In September of 2003, with an eye on further ensuring the safety of competitors, NASCAR announced that racing back to the caution was no longer permitted in all three of the sport's national series. That rule change led NASCAR to institute a procedure where the field is "frozen" on the track once the cau... Read More

How pit road speed limit is calculated

December 13, 2013, , NASCAR.COM

[169727539CH00069_5_hour_ENE]

Pit road speed -- how is it calculated, why does it matter and how does it come into play?

There isn't a policeman hiding behind the pit wall with a radar gun and there aren't speedometers in NASCAR racing vehicles. So how do teams and officials measure pit-road speed limits with a certain amount of precision? We've all seen it happen -- a driver will seem to be minding his own business, making his way down pit road when all of a sudden he gets word that he's been penalized for speeding. But this is NASCAR -- cars are supposed to go fast, right? Yes, but during certain points of the race and in certain locations a particular speed needs to be maintained in order to establish safety for drivers, pit crews and fans. This comes into play on pit road because of the potential frenzy of 43 cars trying to beat each other to the line for track position. Sure, this all makes sense, but in a NASCAR world where more than two miles separates the largest from the smallest tracks, how is this speed calculated? And is it the same for all tracks? The pit road speed varies from track to track, with shorter ones (Bristol, Martinsville, New Hampshire) exhibiting a slower speed than the behemoths o... Read More

Pit road speed -- how is it calculated, why does it matter and how does it come into play?

There isn't a policeman hiding behind the pit wall with a radar gun and there aren't speedometers in NASCAR racing vehicles. So how do teams and officials measure pit-road speed limits with a certain amount of precision? We've all seen it happen -- a driver will seem to be minding his own business, making ... Read More

%>